1.- The Toirano Caves some remarkable show caves of Italy and one of the most notables of the region.

The Toirano Caves (Italian: Grotte di Toirano) are a remarkable karst cave system located in the municipality of Toirano, in the province of Savona, Liguria. They are some remarkable show caves of Italy and one of the most notables of the region. The area is situated close to the town of Toirano and few kilometers to the Ligurian Ponente Riviera.
The exit "Borghetto Santo Spirito" of A10 motorway dists 5 km from the caves. One of the most important caves is "Basura", discovered in 1950, and shelter of the Cave bear.

2.- Italy Photo Gallery: Top 10 most popular articles in June 2013.

Gran Paradiso is the heart of the Gran Paradiso National Park, the homeland of friendly capricorns.
The Gran Paradiso is a mountain group between the Aosta Valley and Piedmont regions of north-west Italy. The peak, the 7th highest mountain in the Graian Alps with an elevation of 4,061 m, is close to Mont Blanc on the nearby border with France. On the French side of the border, the park is continued by the Vanoise National Park. The Gran Paradiso is the only mountain whose summit reaches over 4,000 metres that is entirely within Italian territory.

 

3.- The Best Cathedrals in Italy.

duomo-baptistry-florenceItaly has many majestic cathedrals, often with spectacular works of art inside. A cathedral is a city's main church and is usually called the duomo but also can be named basilica, cattedrale or chiesa madre (mainly in the south).

There are a few rules to observe when visiting a cathedral such as no skimpy clothing, speaking quietly, and sometimes not taking photos inside. While most cathedrals do not charge admission there are a few that do.

 

4.- In Italy there are approximately 1500 the most important museums of the world heritage museum.

musei italiani map

In Italy there are approximately 1500 museums, among them the most important find heritage museum in the world, due to its rich artistic heritage which represents almost half of the world's heritage. The importance of Italian museums exceeded scientific interest and research, about 30 years to become an important social educational tool.

Italy has a wealth of museums displaying art and artifacts from prehistory through modern days. Whether you're looking for archeology, Renaissance paintings, or modern art, Italy has something for you. Find out which museums have what you want to see with this guide to the best museums in Italy.

 

5.- The Fort Ceraino, originally called Fort Hlawaty, is a fortress built by the Austrians in the Veneto region.

FortediCeraino The Fort Ceraino, originally called Fort Hlawaty, is a fortress built by the Austrians, which rises in the territory of the municipality of Dolcè on the left bank of the Adige. Passed in 1866 in Italian hands, took the name of Fort Ceraino (from the locality of the municipality is located).
Currently decommissioned by the army, is in a state of neglect.
The Ceraino Fort, built by the Austrians between 1850 and 1851, was called by them to the Lieutenant Field Marshal Johann von Hlavaty in recognition for his work as a military architect. After 1866, when Veneto was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy, was called Fort Ceraino.

 

6.- The Uffizi Gallery is the one of the oldest and most famous art museums of the Western world.

museo uffizi

The Uffizi Gallery  is a museum in Florence, Italy. It is one of the oldest and most famous art museums of the Western world. Building of the palace was begun by Giorgio Vasari in 1560 for Cosimo I de' Medici as the offices for the Florentine magistrates — hence the name "uffizi" ("offices"). Construction was continued to Vasari's design by Alfonso Parigi and Bernardo Buontalenti and ended in 1581. The cortile (internal courtyard) is so long and narrow, and open to the Arno River at its far end through a Doric screen that articulates the space without blocking it, that architectural historians treat it as the first regularized streetscape of Europe.

 

7.- Beautiful views of the Ligurian Sea, to the south, and the hills of the Maritime Alps and the Ligurian Apennines, north (Part 5).

Monte Frontè: Saccarello in the foreground, the background and the Bego Gelas

8.- Royal Palace of Caserta, the best example of Italian Baroque.

There are some walks that are unforgettable, which remain a lasting memory. It happens when we are completely surrounded by beauty. This year, the park oft he Reggia di Caserta has been awarded the prize as the most beautifulpark in Italy, it has already beenproclai-med a World Heritage Site by Unesco, and is one ofthe most char-ming places in Italy.
The driveway which runs from thè main entrarne leads to the Royal Palace and is three kilometres in length, and along the driveway there are water displays, cascades andpools alternate with splendid fountains.

 

9.- The Best Ruins in Italy.

Foro_Romano_da_Palazzo_SenatorioRoman Forum (Rome): Two thousand years ago, most of the known world was directly affected by decisions made in the Roman Forum. Today classicists and archaeologists wander among its ruins, conjuring up the glory that was Rome. What you'll see today is a pale, rubble-strewn version of the once-majestic site -- it's now surrounded by modern boulevards packed with whizzing cars.

 

10.- A beautiful mountain lake in the Dolomite Mountain Range.

The Dolomites are a mountain range located in north-eastern Italy. It is a part of Southern Limestone Alps and extends from the River Adige in the west to the Piave Valley (Pieve di Cadore) in the east. The northern and southern borders are defined by the Puster Valley and the Sugana Valley (Val Sugana). The Dolomites are nearly equally shared between the provinces of Belluno, South Tyrol and Trentino.

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costa_esmeraldaCosta Esmeralda (Sardinia): Since the 1960s, The Emerald Coast of Sardinia has been a mecca of the rich and famous, many arriving on million-dollar yachts for an off-the-record vacation. Heavenly bays are overlooked by olive tree covered hills. The coast with its sandy beaches is studded with some of the poshest beach resorts in Europe.

  • Spoleto: Spoleto is as ancient as the Roman Empire and as timeless as the music presented there every summer during its world-renowned arts festival. The architecture of this quintessential Umbrian hill town is centered on a core of religious buildings from the 13th century. It's even more romantic during the off season, when the crowds are less dense.
  • Bellagio: Often called "the prettiest town in Europe," Bellagio is perhaps the loveliest town in Italy's beautiful Lake District. Its lakeside promenade, which follows the shores of Lake Como, is fragrant with flowers in bloom. Couples can spend their days exploring the arcaded streets and little shops, visiting lush gardens, and relaxing in the sun.
  • Capri: Floating amid azure seas south of Naples, Capri is called the "Island of Dreams." Everywhere, you'll find the aroma of lemon trees in bloom. Roman emperors Augustus and Tiberius both went there for R & R, and since the late 1800s celebrities have flocked to Capri for an escape. A boat ride around the island's rugged coastline is one of our favorite things to do.
  • Ravello: It's small, sunny, and loaded with notable buildings (such as its 1086 cathedral). Despite its choice position on the Amalfi coast, Ravello manages to retain the aura of an old-fashioned village. Famous residents have included writer Gore Vidal.
  • Taormina: This resort, the loveliest place in Sicily, is brimming with regional charm, chiseled stonework, and a sense of the ages. Favored by wealthy Europeans and dedicated artists, especially in midwinter, when the climate is delightful, Taormina is a fertile oasis of olive groves, grapevines, and orchards. Visitors will relish the delights of the sun, the sea, and the medieval setting.

    ravello-panorama

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    Foro_Romano_da_Palazzo_SenatorioRoman Forum (Rome): Two thousand years ago, most of the known world was directly affected by decisions made in the Roman Forum. Today classicists and archaeologists wander among its ruins, conjuring up the glory that was Rome. What you'll see today is a pale, rubble-strewn version of the once-majestic site -- it's now surrounded by modern boulevards packed with whizzing cars.

  • Palatine Hill (Rome): According to legend, the Palatine Hill was the site where Romulus and Remus (the orphaned infant twins who survived by being suckled by a she-wolf) eventually founded the city. Although Il Palatino is one of the seven hills of ancient Rome, you'll find it hard to distinguish it as such because of the urban congestion rising all around. The site is enhanced by the Farnese Gardens (Orti Farnesiani), laid out in the 1500s on the site of Tiberius's palace.
  • The Colosseum (Rome): Rome boasts only a handful of other ancient monuments that survive in such well-preserved condition. A massive amphitheater set incongruously amid a maze of modern traffic, the Colosseum was once the setting for gladiator combat, lion-feeding frenzies, and public entertainment whose cruelty was a noted characteristic of the empire (just ask Russell Crowe). All three of the ancient world's classical styles (Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian) are represented, superimposed in tiers one above the other.
  • Hadrian's VillaHadrian's Villa (Villa Adriana; near Tivoli): Hadrian's Villa slumbered in rural obscurity until the 1500s, when Renaissance popes ordered its excavation. Only then was the scale of this enormous and beautiful villa from A.D. 134 appreciated. Its builder, Hadrian, who had visited almost every part of his empire, wanted to incorporate the wonders of the world into one building site -- and he succeeded.
  • Ostia Antica (near Rome): During the height of the Roman Empire, Ostia ("mouth" in Latin) was the harbor town set at the point where the Tiber flowed into the sea. As Rome declined, so did Ostia; by the early Middle Ages, the town had almost disappeared, its population decimated by malaria. In the early 1900s, archaeologists excavated the ruins of hundreds of buildings, many of which you can view.
  • Herculaneum (Campania): Legend says that Herculaneum was founded by Hercules. The historical facts tell us that it was buried under rivers of volcanic mud one fateful day in A.D. 79 after the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Seeping into the cracks of virtually every building, the scalding mud preserved the timbers of hundreds of structures that would otherwise have rotted during the normal course of time. Devote at least 2 hours to seeing some of the best-preserved houses from the ancient world.
  • Pompeii (Campania): Once it was an opulent resort filled with 25,000 wealthy Romans. In A.D. 79, the eruption that devastated Herculaneum (above) buried Pompeii under at least 6m (20 ft.) of volcanic ash and pumice stone. Beginning around 1750, Charles of Bourbon ordered the systematic excavation of the ruins -- the treasures hauled out sparked a wave of interest in the classical era throughout northern Europe.
  • Paestum (Campania): Paestum was discovered by accident around 1750 when local bureaucrats tried to build a road across the heart of what had been a thriving ancient city. Paestum originated as a Greek colony around 600 B.C., fell to the Romans in 273 B.C., and declined into obscurity in the final days of the empire. Today amateur archaeologists can follow a well-marked walking tour through the excavations.
  • The Valley of the Temples (Sicily): Although most of the Valley of the Temples in Agrigento lies in ruins, it is one of Europe's most beautiful classical sites, especially in February and March when the almond trees surrounding it burst into pink blossoms. One of the site's five temples dates from as early as 520 B.C.; another (never completed) ranks as one of the largest temples in the ancient world.
  • Segesta (Sicily): Even its site is impressive: a rocky outcropping surrounded on most sides by a jagged ravine. Built around 430 B.C. by the Greeks, Segesta's Doric colonnade is one of the most graceful in the ancient world. The site is stark and mysterious. The temple was probably destroyed by the Saracens (Muslim raiders) in the 11th century.
  • Selinunte (Sicily): The massive columns of Selinunte lie scattered on the ground, as if an earthquake had punished its builders, yet this is one of our favorite ancient ruins in Italy. Around 600 B.C., immigrants from Syracuse built Selinunte into an important trading port. The city was a bitter rival of neighboring Segesta (above) and was destroyed around 400 B.C. and then again in 250 B.C. by the Carthaginians.
  • Hadrian's Villa

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    Palatine Hill

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    Segesta,_Tempio_greco

    The Valley of the Temples

    Paestum

    Herculaneum_Neptune_And_Amphitrite

    Ostia._Theatrum

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    duomo-baptistry-florenceItaly has many majestic cathedrals, often with spectacular works of art inside. A cathedral is a city's main church and is usually called the duomo but also can be named basilica, cattedrale or chiesa madre (mainly in the south).

    There are a few rules to observe when visiting a cathedral such as no skimpy clothing, speaking quietly, and sometimes not taking photos inside. While most cathedrals do not charge admission there are a few that do.

    basilica-superiore-san-francescoThis is not always so, however: there are places where the cathedral and the principal church are not the same (Bologna, for example); and very many places which are not the seats of bishops have a non-episcopal "duomo" and no cathedral at all. In this list, churches known as "duomo" are only included if they are, or have been, episcopal seats, as above.

    There is a very small number of churches, such as that at Monza, which have such exceptional distinction or status that they are comparable in importance to cathedrals without having ever been the seats of bishops, and are commonly known in English as cathedrals. There is a separate (incomplete) list for this small group of churches.

    These are my picks for top Italian cathedrals to visit.

     

  • St. Peter's Basilica (Rome): Its roots began with the first Christian emperor, Constantine, in A.D. 324. By 1400, the Roman basilica was in danger of collapsing, prompting the Renaissance popes to commission plans for the largest, most impressive, most jaw-dropping cathedral the world had ever seen. Amid the rich decor of gilt, marble, and mosaics are countless artworks, including Michelangelo's Pietà. Other sights here are a small museum of Vatican treasures and the eerie underground grottoes containing the tombs of former popes, including the most recently interred, John Paul II. An elevator ride (or a rigorous climb) up the tower to Michelangelo's glorious dome provides panoramic views of Rome.
  • The Duomo of Florence: Begun in the late 1200s and consecrated 140 years later, the pink, green, and white marble Duomo was a symbol of Florence's prestige and wealth. It's loaded with world-class art and is one of Italy's largest and most distinctive religious buildings. A view of its red-tiled dome, erected over a 14-year period in what was at the time a radical new design by Brunelleschi, is worth the trip to Florence. Other elements of the Duomo are Giotto's campanile (bell tower) and the octagonal baptistery (a Romanesque building with bronze doors).
  • The Duomo of Siena: Begun in 1196, this cathedral is one of the most beautiful and ambitious Gothic churches in Italy, with extravagant zebra-striped bands of marble. Masterpieces here include a priceless pavement of masterful mosaics, an octagonal pulpit carved by master sculptor Nicola Pisano, and the lavishly frescoed Piccolomini Library.
  • Basilica di San Francesco (Assisi): St. Francis, protector of small animals and birds, was long dead when construction began on this double-tiered showcase of the Franciscan brotherhood. Giotto's celebrated frescoes reached a new kind of figurative realism in Italian art around 1300, long before the masters of the Renaissance carried the technique even further. Consecrated in 1253, the cathedral is one of the highlights of Umbria and the site of many pilgrimages. It took a direct hit from the 1997 earthquakes but has miraculously made a recovery.
  • The Duomo of Modena: Begun in 1099, this cathedral in a city in Emilia-Romagna is one of the crowing glories of Romanesque architecture in Italy. Divided into three parts, the facade is crowned by the "Angel of Death" carrying a fleur-de-lis, and inside is filled with masterpieces of sculpture, including a rood screen that is supported by Lombard "lions."
  • St. Mark's Basilica (Venice): Surely the most exotic and Eastern of the Western world's churches, the onion-domed and mosaic-covered San Marco took much of its inspiration from Constantinople. Somewhere inside the mysterious candlelit cavern of the 1,000-year-old church, which began as the private chapel of the doges, are the remains of St. Mark, patron saint of Venice's ancient maritime republic.
  • The Duomo of Milan: It took 5 centuries to build this magnificent and ornate Gothic cathedral, the third-largest church in the world. It's marked by 135 marble spires, a stunning triangular facade, and thousands of statues flanking the massive but airy, almost fanciful exterior.
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    Interior of Cathedral at St Mark's Basilica

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    musei italiani map

    In Italy there are approximately 1500 museums, among them the most important find heritage museum in the world, due to its rich artistic heritage which represents almost half of the world's heritage.

    The importance of Italian museums exceeded scientific interest and research, about 30 years to become an important social educational tool.

    Italy has a wealth of museums displaying art and artifacts from prehistory through modern days. Whether you're looking for archeology, Renaissance paintings, or modern art, Italy has something for you. Find out which museums have what you want to see with this guide to the best museums in Italy.

    We present a list of the most important museums in Italy.

  • The Vatican Museums (Rome): Rambling, disorganized, and poorly labeled they might be, but these buildings are packed with treasures accumulated over the centuries by the popes. There's the incomparable Sistine Chapel, such priceless ancient Greek and Roman sculptures as Laocoön and the Belvedere Apollo, buildings whose walls were almost completely executed by Raphael (including his majestic School of Athens), and endless collections of art ranging from (very pagan) Greco-Roman antiquities to Christian art by European masters.

    galeria de la academia venecia

  • Galleria Borghese (Rome): One of the world's great small museums reopened a few years ago after a 14-year restoration breathed new life into the frescoes and decor of this 1613 palace. That's merely the backdrop for the collections, which include masterpieces of baroque sculpture by a young Bernini and paintings by Caravaggio and Raphael.
  • National Etruscan Museum (Rome): Mysterious and, for the most part, undocumented, the Etruscans were the ancestors of the Romans. They left a legacy of bronze and marble sculpture, sarcophagi, jewelry, and representations of mythical heroes, some of which were excavated at Cerveteri, a stronghold north of Rome. Most startling about the artifacts is their sophisticated, almost mystical sense of design. The Etruscan collection is housed in a papal villa dating from the 1500s.
  • Uffizi Gallery (Florence): This 16th-century Renaissance palace was the administrative headquarters, or uffizi (offices), for the Duchy of Tuscany when the Medicis controlled Florence. It's estimated that up to 90% of Italy's artistic patrimony is stored in this building, the crown jewel of Italy's museums. This is the world's greatest collection of Renaissance paintings.
  • Bargello Museum (Florence): Originally built as a fortress palace in 1255, this imposing structure is now a vast repository of some of Italy's most important Renaissance sculpture. Donatello's bronze David is a remarkable contrast to the world-famous Michelangelo icon.
  • National Gallery of Umbria (Perugia): Italian Renaissance art has its roots in Tuscan and Umbrian painting from the 1200s. This collection, on the top floor of the Palazzo dei Priori (parts of which date from the 1400s), contains a world-class collection of paintings, most executed in Tuscany or Umbria between the 13th and the 18th centuries. Included are works by Fra Angelico, Piero della Francesco, Perugino, Duccio, and Gozzoli, among others.
  • Academy Gallery (Venice): One of Europe's great museums, this is an incomparable collection of Venetian painting, exhibited chronologically from the 13th to the 18th century. It's one of the most richly stocked art museums in Italy, boasting hundreds of works by Bellini, Carpaccio, Giorgione, Titian, and Tintoretto.
  • Peggy Guggenheim Collection (Venice): A comprehensive, brilliant modern art collection, assembled by legendary arts patron Peggy Guggenheim, is housed in an unfinished palazzo along the Grand Canal. The collection is a cavalcade of 20th-century art, including works by Max Ernst (one of Ms. Guggenheim's former husbands), Picasso, Braque, Magritte, and Giacometti.
  • Brera Picture Gallery (Milan): Milan is usually associated with wealth and corporate power, and those two things can buy a city its fair share of art and culture. The foremost place to see Milan's artistic treasures is the Brera Picture Gallery, whose collection -- shown in a 17th-century palace -- is especially rich in paintings from the schools of Lombardy and Venice. Three of the most important prizes are Mantegna's Dead Christ, Giovanni Bellini's La Pietà, and Carpaccio's St. Stephen Debating.
  • National Archaeological Museum (Naples): Naples and the region around it have yielded a wealth of sculptural treasures from the Roman Empire. Many of these riches have been accumulated in a rambling building designed as a barracks for the Neapolitan cavalry in the 1500s. Much of the loot excavated from Pompeii and Herculaneum, as well as the Renaissance collections of the Farnese family, is in this museum, which boasts a trove of Greco-Roman antiquities.

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    galeria de la academia venecia

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