It is presumed that the first Ligurian presence in the territory that would in future become Genoa, was between the end of the VI century b.c. and the III century a.d.

The first to settle there was a very ancient society which was common in all of the region of Liguria and who’s culture disappeared completely under the growing power of the Genoese costal population, around the II century a.d. During this time the Oppidum Genuate was established, and was controlled by the Roman Empire until the III century a.d. through the jurisdiction of the foedus equum and later the municipium.

The natural configuration of the territory and the insistent presence of the libeccio (south-west) wind did not allow the establishment of a typical, well defined pre-roman settlement. Instead Genoa began to form its own urban identity. The organization of the area was fragmented between the area of the oppidum genuate , situated on the hills of Castello (facing the south-east side of the natural port), and Sant’Andrea, just a bit further back, and site of the first necropolis.

It is interesting to note that the territory developed according to roman design: starting from the market place at the centre, the settlement (forum) of S Giorgio was divided using the measure of mille passus (circa 1480 meters, the military distance) and urban territories (civitas e castrum) were separated from rustic ones (suburbium).

This type of division in semicircular concentric areas was the basic plan for future medieval settlements.

In the following centuries Genoa began to take on a more defined appearance. The presence of a cathedral confirms that by the IV century it had become a civitas (civilisation) later acknowledged as a true commerrcial centre.

We know that Genoa was attacked in 641 by the army of the Lombard Rotari who destroyed the walls, and burned and ravaged the city. But Genoa healed quickly; the walls were rebuilt, and commerce was restored, and its autonomy was respected throughout the entire period of the Lombard dominion and the successive Frankish one.

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National Parks, Regional Parks, Marine Protected Areas, National Reserves, Regional Reserves, Wetlands and Other Protected Areas.

Nowadays in our Country there are 22 National Parks, and 2 more are waiting to be established. They cover on the whole a surface of one million and a half hectares, about the 5% of the national territory.

The national parks complete the safeguard carried out by the regional parks and vice versa, and they deal with very wide territories (at least, for our national reality) by involving several Towns.

Therefore, besides the great administrative variety (since they have been established by and depend on the Ministero dell'Ambiente) the national parks also differ for their management of a wide and varied territory characterized by a relevant human presence.

Besides planning and supervising, the national parks should also highlight their being a means to make the most of the local realities and to link them one to the other: in other words, they should help them to find in the beauty (and fragility) of the territory in which they are situated an element of cohesion, the key resource to their development.

The marine parks are also gaining an important role in the national safeguard project: they are aimed to protect in an integral manner stretches of sea and of coast (often entire islands or archipelagoes) presenting unique environmental elements and landscapes which are typical of the Mediterranean area.
Read also: The Sassi Di Matera Situated In The Old Town, They Are Composed Of The Sasso Caveoso And The Later Sasso Barisano.
NameRegionsAreaHigh PointElevationEstablishedMapQuick View
Abruzzo, Lazio and MoliseAbruzzo, Lazio, Molise506.83 km2(195.69 sq mi)Monte Petroso2,249 m (7,379 ft)1922Monte Meta.JPG
Alta MurgiaApulia677.39 km2(261.54 sq mi)Torre Disperata686 m (2,251 ft)2004Trullomurgia.jpg
Appennino Lucano - Val d'Agri - LagonegreseBasilicata689.96 km2(266.40 sq mi)Monte del Papa2,005 m (6,578 ft)Monte Volturino.JPG
Appennino Tosco-EmilianoEmilia-Romagna, Tuscany227.92 km2(88.00 sq mi)Monte Cusna2,121 m (6,959 ft)2001Castello carpineti monte cusna.JPG
Archipelago of La MaddalenaSardinia201.46 km2(77.78 sq mi)Punta Tejalone, Caprera[7]212 m (696 ft)1994Arcipelago della Maddalena, Caprera Cala Napoletana 01.JPG
Tuscan ArchipelagoTuscany746.53 km2(288.24 sq mi)Monte Capanne on Elbain the Tuscan Archipelago1,018 m (3,340 ft)1996Tuscan archipelago.pngAerial view of Elba 1.jpg
AsinaraSardinia269.60 km2(104.09 sq mi)Punta Scomunica408 m (1,339 ft)1997Asinara map.pngAsinello bianco sardegna asinara 3593693026 750d1054eb o.jpg
AspromonteCalabria760.53 km2(293.64 sq mi)Montalto1,955 m (6,414 ft)1989Reggiocalabria mappa.png
Cippo di garibaldi in aspromonte.JPG
Cilento, Vallo di Diano, and AlburniCampania1,810.48 km2(699.03 sq mi)Monte Cervati1,898 m (6,227 ft)1991Salerno mappa.pngCapo palinuro.jpg
Cinque TerreLiguria38.60 km2(14.90 sq mi)Monte (Mai-)Pertuso[13]820 m (2,690 ft)1999Parco-Cinque Terre-Posizione.pngCinque Terre .jpg
CirceoLazio84.40 km2(32.59 sq mi)Monte Circeo541 m (1,775 ft)Circeo.JPG
Dolomiti BellunesiVeneto31.51 km2(12.17 sq mi)Monte Pavione2,335 m (7,661 ft)Parco-Dolomiti Bellunesi-Posizione.pngBelluno.JPG
Foreste Casentinesi, Monte Falterona, and CampignaEmilia-Romagna, Tuscany364.00 km2(140.54 sq mi)Monte Falterona1,645 m (5,397 ft)Parco-Foreste Casentinesi-Posizione.pngMonte-Falterona-treeline1.jpg
GarganoApulia1,211.18 km2(467.64 sq mi)Monte Calvo[18]1,065 m (3,494 ft)Gargan0003.jpg
GennargentuSardinia730.00 km2(281.85 sq mi)Punta La Marmora1,834 m (6,017 ft)Cala Goloritze o.jpg
Gran ParadisoValle d'Aosta, Piedmont700.00 km2(270.27 sq mi)Gran Paradiso4,061 m (13,323 ft)Parco-Gran Paradiso-Posizione.png
Gran Sasso & Monti della LagaMarche, Abruzzo, Lazio1,413.31 km2(545.68 sq mi)Corno Grande2,912 m (9,554 ft)Parco-Gran Sasso-Posizione.pngCampo Imperatore.jpg
Isola di PantelleriaSicilyMontagna Grande836 m (2,743 ft)2016Specchio di Venere.jpg
Sibillini MountainsMarche, Umbria697.22 km2(269.20 sq mi)Monte Vettore2,476 m (8,123 ft)Monte Bove Sud.jpg
PollinoBasilicata, Calabria1,711.32 km2(660.74 sq mi)Sierra Dolcedorme2,267 m (7,438 ft)Cosenza pollino.jpg
SilaCalabria736.95 km2(284.54 sq mi)Monte Botte Donato1,928 m (6,325 ft)Botte Donato impianti di risalita vista dalla strada delle vette.jpg
StelvioLombardy, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol1,307.00 km2(504.64 sq mi)Cima Ortles3,905 m (12,812 ft)Parco-Stelvio-Posizione.pngOrtler Nordgrat.jpg
Val GrandePiedmont145.98 km2(56.36 sq mi)Monte Togano2,295 m (7,530 ft)Parco-Val Grande-Posizione.pngPasso Val Grande - Agosto 2001 - Veduta.JPG
VesuviusCampania72.59 km2(28.03 sq mi)Great Cone1,281 m (4,203 ft)
source: Wikipedia
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